Watch "Saul Bass | Vorspann/Intro (Arte +7)" on YouTube

Saul Bass | Vorspann/Intro (Arte +7):

Twelve

(Source: vimeo.com)

t3hsiggy:

nymphamortem:

blue-author:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works: You download the open-source plans for the machine. You build it. You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gifThat’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

I know if I sold overpriced manufactured clothes, I’d see this as a looming menace.

I WILL HAVE HAUTE COUTURE

t3hsiggy:

nymphamortem:

blue-author:

runnerjive:

thre3dprint:

Open Source Clothing.

Now I feel it imperative to reblog this, because the project seems to have hit a snag: The video they put up has been taken down because of claims of 3rd-party content, whatever whatever corporate lawyer stuff internet throttling stuff. That makes me think that Bennetton or one of the others whose stores were glimpsed in the background got their hooks in Vimeo.
So I thought I’d tell you a yarn about how this thing works:
You download the open-source plans for the machine.
You build it.
You download their open-souce clothing-maker program.
You enter the desired measurements into the fields (the ones I remember from the video were arm and neck and chest measurements, so I’m sure they have waist and/or hips too)
You print out your sweater, or hat, or scarf, or cardigan, or whatever it was that you selected. It takes an hour to print out the sweater, working off of the two yarn spools that you can see in the bottom right corner of this .gif
That’s it. Custom-fit, custom-color clothing in an hour, for the price of yarn. Can you see why one of the clothing companies targetted in the video might have felt threatened enough to force the video to come down?

I know if I sold overpriced manufactured clothes, I’d see this as a looming menace.

I WILL HAVE HAUTE COUTURE

(Source: prostheticknowledge)

Watch "Dolphin Productions - "Demo Reel" (1978)" on YouTube

Dolphin Productions - “Demo Reel” (1978):

Levi Fisher Ames - Animals in shadowboxes. 1895-1923
© Photo: Haupt & Binder

Levi Fisher Ames - Animals in shadowboxes. 1895-1923

© Photo: Haupt & Binder

(Source: universes-in-universe.org)

sfcinematheque:

Shoreditch: Experimental Music School 1969

This vintage (1969) BBC program looks at “experimental music education,” of the time. We’re not sure if it’s the most awesome thing ever – or the most disturbing. Either way, it’s a fascinating look at how some of the avant garde musical approaches of the day – including electronics and system music -  were brought into the classroom.

Torsten Lauschmann - Ice Diamond (2013)

Torsten Lauschmann - Ice Diamond (2013)

(via RIFT TAKEOVER)
Tune in on Basic.fm

(via RIFT TAKEOVER)

Tune in on Basic.fm

(Source: sehrschon)

Art's Post-Media Malaise

Pauline Oliveros - A Love Song

jacobaaronschroeder:

Untitled
Acrylic and sprinkles on canvas
14” x 18”
2014